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dc.contributor.authorBermejo Gozálvez, Javier 
dc.coverage.spatialeast=-0.9792423248291016; north=37.60047921597441; name=Cons. Medico Los Mateos -Cart, 30202 Cartagena, Murcia, Españaes_ES
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-15T16:12:04Z
dc.date.available2018-02-15T16:12:04Z
dc.date.issued2018-01
dc.description.abstractThe aim of the present work is the simulation of the suspension used in an in-design vehicle developed by the UPCT Formula Student team to take part in several international competitions. A determined mechanism geometry is considered in order to focus in the optimization of the system behaviour. As a result of these simulations, the relationship between the common selected design parameters and the vehicle stability are explicitly set out, e.g. the weight transfer onto wheels has a straight connection with the vehicle stability and performance. For a determined suspension geometry, the load on each wheel increases with the normal acceleration provided by the steering system and the vehicle velocity. Thus, a fundamental question which will be analized in this work is the suspension behaviour and steering effects. In its simplest terms a race circuit may be thought of as a number of segments composed of a corner, a straight and another corner. The curvature of the plot of speed versus path distance in the vecinity of the corner is due to braking and accelerating during cornering. The race driver is conscious of an aditional form of acceleration, namely cornering acceleration. This acceleration is associated with the change in direction of the velocity with time. Suspension geometry means the broad subject of how the unsprung mass of a vehicle is connected to the sprung mass. These connections not only dictate the path of relative motion, they also control the forces that are transmitted between them. Any particular geometry must be designed to meet the needs of the particular vehicle for which it is to be applied. There is no single best geometry for all of the vehicles. Ackermann geometry is commonly used for low lateral acceleration usage (street cars). This geometry ensures that all the wheels roll freely with no slip angles because the wheels are steered to track a common turn center. As the front wheels of a vehicle are steered away from the straight-ahead position, the design of the steering linkage will determine if the wheels stay parallel or if one wheel steers more than the other. For normal turns the small angle aproximation, wheelbase/curve radius, is close to the required steering angle. When a pneumatic tire is not subject to any force perpendicular to the wheel plane, it will move along the wheel plane. If, however, a side force is applied to a tire, a lateral force will be developed on the contact path, and the tire will move along a path at an angle with the wheelplane. The angle is usually referred to as the slip angle. These angles for the four wheels determine the vehicle’s trayectory, and in turn, the lateral force. The load on each wheel is also determined by this lateral force. This work starts with a review of available literature, which provides a basic scheme to select the boundary conditions and simulation parameters range which will be analysed in order to achieve the optimal suspension. Once the model is built, a commercial software is used to implement the simulation. This software has been selected among the most valued ones in the industrial applications. In order to improve the knowledge of all the tools of the software to obtain the best results in the simulations, several test samples have been developed before starting to work with the real suspension and steering system. The given plots allow us to find the relationship between the input parameters and slip angles and other important functions. From the results ploted, we can find out the best range for every dimensions, dynamic coefficients and angles necessary to improve the design. By now, the UPCT Formula Student team has focused more on defining the suspension geometry rather than simulate it and analyze the parameters effects. In order to assess these effects, the results will be compared.es_ES
dc.formatapplication/pdfes_ES
dc.language.isoenges_ES
dc.rightsAtribución-NoComercial-SinDerivadas 3.0 España*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/es/*
dc.title.alternativeAnálisis de la suspensión de un coche de carrera de Formula Student mediante software de simulación de dinámica multicuerpoes_ES
dc.titleAnalysis of suspension of a Formula Student race car by a multibody-dynamics simulation softwarees_ES
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/bachelorThesises_ES
dc.subject.otherIngeniería Mecánicaes_ES
dc.contributor.advisorMoreno Nicolás, José Andrés 
dc.contributor.advisorFranco Chumillas, Patricio 
dc.subjectIngeniería del transportees_ES
dc.subjectTransport engineeringes_ES
dc.subjectVehículo automotores_ES
dc.subjectMotor vehicleses_ES
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10317/6444
dc.description.centroEscuela Técnica Superior de Ingeniería Industriales_ES
dc.contributor.departmentIngeniería Mecánicaes_ES
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses
dc.description.universityUniversidad Politécnica de Cartagenaes_ES
dc.subject.unesco3317 Tecnología de Vehículos de Motores_ES


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Atribución-NoComercial-SinDerivadas 3.0 España
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Atribución-NoComercial-SinDerivadas 3.0 España